Jonathan D. Miller

Executive Bio

Jonathan Miller is a partner and co-owner of Miller Ryan LLC, a strategic marketing communications consulting firm to the financial services and real estate industries. Miller has more than 25 years of communications and marketing experience in the real estate industry, counseling many leading executives. For the past 15 years he has also authored Emerging Trends in Real Estate, the Urban Land Institute’s (ULI) premier annual industry forecast and speaks extensively on suburban and urban issues. He is also author of ULI's Infrastructure 2008: A Global Perspectives, a major analysis on the looming changes facing the

U.S. on infrastructure and land use issues. He has led marketing/communications teams at Equitable Real Estate, Lend Lease, and GMAC Commercial Mortgage (Capmark Finance), overseeing re-branding programs for those firms as well as for COMPASS, Boston Financial and Amresco when they were acquired by Lend Lease. He has extensive crisis communications and corporate-change experience. Miller graduated with honors from Northwestern's Medill School of Journalism and earned a law degree cum laude from American University. Contact Jonathan Miller.

  • Shareholder Value and Real Estate

    Fast food workers around the country are rebelling at wages bordering close to the minimum wage and the fast food companies threaten to automate more of their systems and eliminate workers so their message to workers is take it or leave it.

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  • Shareholder Value and Real Estate

    Fast food workers around the country are rebelling at wages bordering close to the minimum wage and the fast food companies threaten to automate more of their systems and eliminate workers so their message to workers is take it or leave it.

    Read More
  • Shareholder Value and Real Estate

    Fast food workers around the country are rebelling at wages bordering close to the minimum wage and the fast food companies threaten to automate more of their systems and eliminate workers so their message to workers is take it or leave it.

    Read More
  • Motown’s Message

    The car companies brought their headquarters back into the city. The Tigers kept their stadium in downtown and the Lions moved back. You would see some PR about new tech start-ups and strip of restaurant and entertainment venues in the heart of the city. But the population continued to hollow out and vast swaths of empty areas literally were turned back to nature or in other words abandoned. City services stopped in many near empty neighborhoods and the police force is able to solve only a small fraction of reported crimes.

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  • Twinkie World

    There’s an estimated $70 billion in institutional capital wanting to find a home in real estate, but unable to get in the door. Meanwhile, hundreds of wannabe managers and partnerships try to raise more money when managers and operators with secured commitments have trouble finding sound investments… The top markets appear too pricey, everywhere else appears too risky, especially the further out in the suburbs you look.

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  • Topping Out?

    At lunch yesterday someone raised the lurking question—“Have values topped out?” Since we were sitting in the middle of Manhattan sushi den, I presumed he was talking about the New York office market. And of course, New York is a special case—a unique, global gateway where everybody wants in and foreign money all too readily grabs for a piece of the action.

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  • The Worm Starts to Turn

    ADDENDUM: Blog Addendum—How revealing is the news behind Tuesday’s CNN headline after Wall Street’s rebound from recent market declines—“Stocks higher on weaker GDP data—hopes rise that interest rates stay low.” Is this investing turned on its head? We used to buy shares in companies based on their prospects for increased earnings from sound business models. Here we get more news that reinforces views about relative weakness in the underlying economy and that sends markets into buy mode, because the government will keep printing more money and provide cheap financing, which helps trading spreads and CFO balance sheet manipulations. Unfortunately, real estate investors need increased GDP to spur office leasing and retail sales for higher shopping center returns. In that vein, the announcement from big law firm Weil Gotshal should not be welcome news to office brokers. Weil announced layoffs of associates and compensation reductions for some partners, probably a harbinger of more thinning to come among the professional ranks where firms cannot command the same level of fees from corporate clients they once did. That gives Bernanke and friends more prodding to be cautious and keep rates low. It’s just another buy signal, right? As noted below: the U.S economy is certainly no great shakes, but China deserves our special concern…

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  • Hold Onto Your Wallets

    There was another article in the paper over the weekend about how more mutual fund investors are wising up and moving away from stock picker managers to index funds, because the majority of pickers don’t beat the index while charging significantly higher fees for their questionable value add, further eating into returns.

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  • Infrastructure—Jobs or Jam-ups?

    Government deficits decrease, partly because of budget cuts and higher taxes, but mostly just because the economy is improving enough to generate more business and commerce and more income and sales taxes.

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  • Advisor Shakeout Underway

    So many real estate advisors looking for new allocations to stay afloat, so many lackluster or worse returns to find in legacy funds, so much capital looking for yield, and so much of that money going only to the top performing fund managers while the also-rans run out of time.

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