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Once again, this has very little to do with the Port of Houston and more to do with the confluence of three different types of trucking in and around this area. Namely these three are over-the-road truck firms along I-20 just west of where it intersects with I-45, break-down trucking firms that dot the area, and, of course, the container trucking firms working out of the railway container terminal. These three trucking firms should attract manufacturing and other industries with many of them having their own trucking fleets. I can't think of another area like this outside of a particular area in Houston close to its port. But Houston doesn't have a legitimate bypass like I-20. Another by-pass Loop 9 I believe it is called is planned to the south of this area.
Once again, this area's proximity to the port of Houston is just one factor. The major factor is the types of different types of trucking being attracted to this particular area which, because of there confluence, should give it major growth potential.
Posted by Mister Nifty | Wednesday, October 17 2012 at 12:34AM ET
Thanks, Mr. Nifty, for your comments. You're right in that there's good "inland port" potential here thanks to the infrastructure of roads and rail which has attracted other companies. The other factor (which I didn't mention in this particular article though should have) is that huge amount of land in the southern Dallas sector; plenty of room to expand. There are reasons why this particular submarket has struggled in the past. Whether Prime Rail will succeed in growing this into another large inland port remains to be seen but it does have a pretty good start and Rader has a realistic outlook on the situation.
Posted by Amy Wolff Sorter | Wednesday, October 17 2012 at 8:31AM ET
Thanks, Mr. Nifty, for your comments. You're right in that there's good "inland port" potential here thanks to the infrastructure of roads and rail which has attracted other companies. The other factor (which I didn't mention in this particular article though should have) is that huge amount of land in the southern Dallas sector; plenty of room to expand. There are reasons why this particular submarket has struggled in the past. Whether Prime Rail will succeed in growing this into another large inland port remains to be seen but it does have a pretty good start and Rader has a realistic outlook on the situation.
Posted by Amy Wolff Sorter | Wednesday, October 17 2012 at 8:33AM ET