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CHICAGO-The local office of the Federal Bureau of Investigation labels as “completely false” a report that terrorists were planning to use truck bombs to destroy the 110-story Sears Tower. However, managers of Sears Tower, owned by Toronto-based TrizecHahn TrizecHahn Office Properties, did meet with FBI agents Monday.

Special agent Ross Rice, spokesman for the FBI’s Chicago office, tells GlobeSt.com that an ABC News report that five men arrested in Detroit, Chicago and Cedar Rapids, IA last week were planning an attack at the tallest building in North America “inaccurate, unconfirmed and irresponsible.”

The office added in a statement that “the FBI is not aware of any credible plans” of a terrorist attack aimed at Sears Tower, which was evacuated the morning of Sept.11, when hijacked commercial jets were slammed into the twin towers of the World Trade Center in New York City.

Rice did say, however, that FBI agents met with Sears Tower management officials Monday. TrizecHahn officials had no comment, referring inquiries to the FBI. Chicago police department experts also have met with owners and managers of most other Downtown high-rise buildings in the wake of the attacks, encouraging them to “challenge” visitors to their buildings via the lobbies and loading docks.

Security already has been beefed up following the World Trade Center and Pentagon attacks, with additional private security and Chicago police officers on site. In addition, anyone entering the building must show photo identification to security guards. Employees have ID cards, but visitors also must sign in and state their destination in the building. Bags, briefcases, purses, boxes and packages also are subject to a search.

Parking already is banned on the streets surrounding Sears Tower. However, there reportedly has been some discussion about erecting concrete barriers around the building, which may thwart vehicle attacks.

“We haven’t talked about that here,” Chicago department of planning and development spokesman Pete Scales tells GlobeSt.com. “I’m not sure if that’d be our call, though. That would be a security issue.”

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