X

Thank you for sharing!

Your article was successfully shared with the contacts you provided.

ALLEN PARK, MI-Ford Land is planning a major new development on the site of a former clay mine in Allen Park. Ford Land, the development and real estate arm of Ford Motor, says it will create Fairlane Green, a one-million-sf “green” retail and recreational center on the 243-acre site of the recently closed Allen Park Clay Mine Landfill.

Ford says Fairlane Green will be the largest landfill redevelopment project in Michigan and the largest under construction in the country for retail use. When complete, in addition to the approximately one million sf of retail space, the property will include a 43-acre park and 3.5 miles of recreational trails.

“Fairlane Green is a truly innovative development that is setting a new standard for responsible land use and development,” says Sean McCourt, chairman of Ford Land. “It will be a highly visible and tangible demonstration of Ford Motor Co.’s belief that good business can and should be environmentally and socially responsible.”

The site is located between Oakwood Boulevard and Outer Drive, near Interstate 94 and the Southfield Freeway in Allen Park. “I am very proud to see this re-use of land, which will provide new employment opportunities and shopping experiences for the residents of Allen Park,” says Allen Park Mayor Richard Huebler.

The first phase of development calls for 408,000 sf of retail businesses on 105 acres. Subsequent phases include the park and approximately 600,000 sf of additional retail.

Ford Land sold Phase I to Archon Group, the real estate subsidiary of Goldman Sachs, located in Texas. Ford owns remaining phases of the planned development. According to Brad Kempson, director of retail leasing at Archon, Phase I will be anchored by a 124,000-sf Target store to open in October 2005. Other signed national retailers include Barnes & Noble, Bed, Bath & Beyond, Famous Footwear, Lane Bryant, Longhorn Steakhouse, Michael’s, Old Navy, On-the-Border, Pier 1 Imports, T.J. Maxx and World Market. The property was originally a clay quarry until it was converted to a landfill in the mid-1950s.

Want to continue reading?
Become a Free ALM Digital Reader.

Once you are an ALM digital member, you’ll receive:

  • Unlimited access to GlobeSt and other free ALM publications
  • Access to 15 years of GlobeSt archives
  • Your choice of GlobeSt digital newsletters and over 70 others from popular sister publications
  • 3 free articles* across the ALM subscription network every 30 days
  • Exclusive discounts on ALM events and publications

*May exclude premium content
Already have an account?

Dig Deeper

GlobeSt

Join GlobeSt

Don't miss crucial news and insights you need to make informed commercial real estate decisions. Join GlobeSt.com now!

  • Free unlimited access to GlobeSt.com's trusted and independent team of experts who provide commercial real estate owners, investors, developers, brokers and finance professionals with comprehensive coverage, analysis and best practices necessary to innovate and build business.
  • Exclusive discounts on ALM and GlobeSt events.
  • Access to other award-winning ALM websites including ThinkAdvisor.com and Law.com.

Already have an account? Sign In Now
Join GlobeSt

Copyright © 2020 ALM Media Properties, LLC. All Rights Reserved.