It's none too soon, say city officials. The razing most likelywill put another 4.3 acres into the city's hands in a deal with thestate, Fernando Costa, Ft. Worth planning director, tellsGlobeSt.com. Far beyond the extra developable land for high-densitycommercial and residential projects is the more direct link thatwill result between the CBD and medical district, the city's twohighest employment areas accounting for a total of 70,000 workers."It's important to recognize that the downtown and medical districtare the economic hearts of the city," says Costa.

Lancaster Bridge, which spans Interstate 30, opened in March1960. It will take eight to 12 weeks to dismantle. The work getsunderway Monday by Champagne-Webber of Houston, which has beenawarded a $153 million contract from the state.

A $14-million road project will follow the razing as Ft. Worthofficials negotiate for the added acreage. Then, it's time torezone from industrial to commercial and residential and look forwilling developers to buy the parcels, which could be as many as12, says Costa.

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