George Thorn, principal of Mile High Development and a long-timeDenver developer, says that because most of the buildings are beingconstructed along the edge of the CBD, Denver's skyline willchange. If they were in the core of Downtown, much larger buildingsthat were constructed in Downtown Denver in the 1980s would hidethem, Thorn tells GlobeSt.com. These latest high-rises are thefirst to be built in downtown since 1999 Broadway opened in1985.

Thorn notes to GlobeSt.com that the last building boom downtownDenver in the early and mid-1980s, primarily by Canadiandevelopers, largely brought spec office buildings downtown. Thatbuilding boom was predicated on oil reaching $60 or more perbarrel, something that didn't occur for another 20 years. When theenergy prices collapsed in the 1980s, downtown's office demanddried up for years, and was extremely overbuilt. Now, downtown'soffice market is the healthiest of all the submarkets, butbuildings still don't command the rents that would justify new specoffice construction.

A partial list of the buildings under way or planned,include:

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