"The purpose of the report is to highlight the economic strengthand changes underway in the overall NYC building industry. We foundthe industry as a whole comprises literally 25% of the city'seconomy," says Richard Anderson, president of the New York BuildingCongress.

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New York City comptroller William Thompson, says in a statementthat the study shows how essential this sector is to the life ofthe city. "The industry creates jobs, stimulates our economy andprovides the infrastructure that is the backbone of New York. It isclear that construction community has been at the forefront ofmaking New York the great city that it is. Behind every building,every bridge and every structure are countless hours of laborcoupled with great creativity."

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Of the three sectors which comprise the buildingindustry--design, construction and real estate--construction is thelargest. In 2005, which is the year covered in the survey,construction made up $27.4 billion of New York City's economicactivity. Real estate leasing and property management came insecond with $25.9 billion.

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Bedrock of the Economy also reported that for building industrydollar an additional $0.50 is created through related industries.This means while netting almost $61 billion the industryjumpstarted almost $90 billion in 2005.

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The industry's work force also hails from a variety ofbackgrounds, although the study found that the vast majority liveand work in New York City. Roughly 72% of building industryemployees live and work in the city, with Queens and Brooklyncontaining the greatest number of construction workers andManhattan the greatest number of real estate workers.

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The study finds that the building industry accounted for 8% ofall jobs for white workers and 7% for minority workers. Almost 50%of all the industry's employees were born abroad with immigrantsholding 64% of jobs in the Building service sector and 48% ofconstruction jobs.

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Employees range in age from 30 to 50 years with the peak between35 and 39 years of age. Anderson says the most surprising studyfinding was that the average age of a construction worker hasdropped by 11 years in the last decade to today's average of 40years. He attributes the younger workers to increased immigration."On all levels people are being drawn to New York to do this workfrom across the globe."

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With a slue of long-term, extensive projects in the pipelinesuch as Hudson Yards, Atlantic Yards, World Trade Center, and thetwo new baseball stadiums, the building industry will continue tosee strong returns. Anderson says while it is difficult to predictthe length of the building industry's strength, it is sure to lastseveral more years.

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