SVN president Jerry Anderson says the expansion, which beganfive years ago, coincides with the 20-year-old firm's decision tobolster its presence in the industrial and office sectors."Historically, we've been mostly in retail and multi-family," heexplains. "But more recently, office and industrial have come torepresent about 30% of our transactions. We expect that percentageto increase."

|

According to Anderson, the firm structured its expansion througha program that grants licenses to existing companies to operateunder the SVN banner. JBM, for example, now operates asJBMRA-Sperry Van Ness Institutional. Anderson says the arrangement,which the Federal Trade Commission formally regards as a franchisebusiness, provides more than the network organization provided bycompanies like Corfac or NAI. "SVN presents a very unified frontcompared to a network," he asserts. "We have much stronger policiesand procedures to make sure all our offices deliver consistentservice."

|

Before the JBM acquisition, SVN enhanced its US marketpenetration with offices in Chicago, New York City, Denver andSeattle. It also began an international expansion, adding licenseesin Costa Rica and Panama. Anderson says the firm will be meetingsoon with prospective SVN licensees in the Middle East.

|

"This growth allows Sperry Van Ness to support real estateadvisors globally while closely connecting foreign and US realestate investors with opportunities worldwide," says companyco-founder and CEO Mark Van Ness. "Our diversified roster oftrusted advisors, with deeply rooted relationships around theworld, has been instrumental in paving the way for our national andinternational expansion efforts."

|

Anderson says the firm does not base its licensing choices on apotential partner's strengths in one property type or another butrather on the quality of its brokers and agents. "We always look attheir roster of agents. The strength of any company is based on theagents," he says.

|

He says the firm that recently joined SVN in Chicago is locatedin the Loop and focuses on office product, with very littleindustrial. A firm it added north of Seattle, on the other hand,primarily handles industrial product. "If they're not strong in oneproduct type or another, we can help them build their teams. Whatmatters is the level of commitment they've shown to theirbusiness," he says.

|

Anderson reports SVN is adding about 30 to 40 firms per year toits practice, but says the company has managed to maintain strictqualifications for entry. "We are very selective," he declares. "Wehad one owner tell us it was harder to get into SVN than to getinto military intelligence. We're that stringent."

|

According to Anderson, the firm, which has about 150 offices,seeks to break into the ranks of the top 10 brokerages within twoto three years. It is looking to enter Dallas, Houston and Miamiand increase its presence in Central New Jersey and Mid-Atlanticmarkets like Washington, DC. It is also seeking additionalinternational opportunities. Anderson emphasizes that establishedforeign relationships would play a large role in its decisionsabout which firms to license under the SVN banner.

Want to continue reading?
Become a Free ALM Digital Reader.

  • Unlimited access to GlobeSt and other free ALM publications
  • Access to 15 years of GlobeSt archives
  • Your choice of GlobeSt digital newsletters and over 70 others from popular sister publications
  • 1 free article* every 30 days across the ALM subscription network
  • Exclusive discounts on ALM events and publications
NOT FOR REPRINT

© 2024 ALM Global, LLC, All Rights Reserved. Request academic re-use from www.copyright.com. All other uses, submit a request to [email protected]. For more information visit Asset & Logo Licensing.