The 1.1-million-sf facility is being developed by FirstIndustrial Realty Trust Inc. and general contractor the Norwood Co.with oversight from CB Richard Ellis' project management group, ledby managing director James Carter. Carter tells GlobeSt.com thatthe facility will be used to manufacture Arm & Hammer'sconcentrated laundry detergent, which uses less water in itsmanufacture and is smaller and easier to ship than conventionaldetergents, thus fitting it into the company's aim to beenvironmentally friendly.

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"Church & Dwight realized back in the 1970s that phosphorusin laundry soap was detrimental to the environment, so they changedthe formula," says Carter. "They were green before green waspopular. The whole business plan for this building is based on thefact that they have to provide a quality product to the consumerthat uses less water to make and less gas to ship."

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The company's commitment to environmental responsibility extendsto the new facility, which will be named after former CEO andcompany chairman Robert Davies III. The building has been designedwith LEED Silver certification in mind, with energy efficientlighting and manufacturing equipment and offices that will beheated and cooled using geothermal energy. In addition, the companyhopes to construct a rainwater collection system and will use solarpower to heat some of the water used in the building. Overall,Church & Dwight hopes to meet its goals of 30% reduction inenergy consumption and a 50% reduction in solid waste andindustrial effluent for the site.

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Once complete, the Davies Facility will house manufacturing,office, processing and warehouse space and will generate anestimated 300 jobs. The company plans to close its current laundrydetergent manufacturing plantand distribution buildings in North Brunswick, NJ and consolidateits operations at the new facility, which will be expandable up to1.9 million sf to meet the company's future needs. The location, inJackson Township, is about 100 miles from Philadelphia, close tothe detergent bottle and ingredients suppliers as well asInterstates 81 and 83, US Route 30, the Pennsylvania Turnpike andthe local railroad, which has ties to the Norfolk Southern, CSX andCanadian Pacific lines.

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According to Carter, a total of six states competed for theproject, with the York site and a site in West Virginia emerging asfrontrunners. The York site, which was purchased from locally basedStewart & Tate with the help of CBRE senior vice presidentsJoseph McDermott and Mindy Lissner, was chosen due to its strategiclocation near rail and available utilities. The total cost of theproject, including site acquisition, construction of the buildingand severance and transition expenses for the North Brunswick plantemployees, is estimated to be about $170 million. The facility isdue to be operational by the end of 2009.

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