MIAMI—Miami Beckham United has picked the spotfor the new Major League Soccer (MLS) stadium. The ownership group,led by David Beckham, MarceloClaure, and Simon Fuller, is evaluatingsites.

|

“We're still working hard to give the South Florida public whatthey want and deserve and we're in the process of evaluatingpotential stadium sites in Miami-Dade County," says John Alschuler,Strategic Advisor to Miami Beckham United. "However we have alwayssaid that there are other communities that would welcome an MLSclub owned by David and his partners.”

|

But will it a stadium ultimately be approved? Should it beapproved? That was one of the topics of discussion at ForbesLATAM's first-ever South Florida Real EstateForum in the United States last week at theEpic Hotel in Downtown Miami.

|

In a panel called “Why South Florida?,” experts discussed aMajor League Soccer Stadium in Downtown Miami. MelMartinez, a former US Senator and chairman of Southeastand Latin America, JP Morgan Chase, was thefirst to chime in. He said, rightly, that nothing is more emotionalthan land use at the local level.

|

“To me, frankly, the opportunity to bring a Major League Soccerteam to a city like Miami is a total no brainer,” Martinez said.“The need for a specific stadium just for soccer is a hard sell formost taxpayers in difficult economic times. So we have tounderstand that. Having said all that, I have to believe that asoccer stadium in this community, with Beckham at the head of it,and the opportunity it brings—all of this has got to cometogether.”

|

Eugene Anderson, dean of School of BusinessAdministration at the University of Miami, is in favor of thestadium. Branding-wise, he said, it's “terrific” for someone likeDavid Beckham to pave the way for a soccer team in Miami.

|

“Having a major sports facility that can be used for so manydifferent things is important,” he said. “Why should the USnational team be playing so many games in Columbus, Ohio? There aregood reasons why [a soccer stadium in Miami] makes sense. Thechallenge is to figure out how we get it done.”

|

Alyce Robertson, executive director of theMiami Downtown Development Authority, is alsobullish about a soccer stadium in Miami. She addressed one of thechallenges in her comments: public transportationinfrastructure.

|

“We need to look at the tie in to public transportation that weas a community need to finish out our system,” she said. “Thesoccer stadium should go next to public transportation. When wefinish that job, it will be easier to locate a site for a soccerstadium.”

|

As Martinez sees it, once Miami's governmental leadersunderstand the stadium is going to be built they will come to gripswith the location. He's not too concerned with whether it's on thewaterfront.

|

“I just think it's about having good road access, being in asafe area of town, and getting the parking—and getting it done,”Martinez said. “At the end of the day, start building and bring ateam. It will be incredible for Miami.”

Want to continue reading?
Become a Free ALM Digital Reader.

  • Unlimited access to GlobeSt and other free ALM publications
  • Access to 15 years of GlobeSt archives
  • Your choice of GlobeSt digital newsletters and over 70 others from popular sister publications
  • 1 free article* every 30 days across the ALM subscription network
  • Exclusive discounts on ALM events and publications
NOT FOR REPRINT

© 2024 ALM Global, LLC, All Rights Reserved. Request academic re-use from www.copyright.com. All other uses, submit a request to [email protected]. For more information visit Asset & Logo Licensing.