Andrew Wright, CEO and managing partner of Franklin Street

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ATLANTA—After 10 years in the industry, Franklin Streethas learned plenty—and overcome its fair share of challenges.GlobeSt.com caught up with Andrew Wright, the firm's CEO andmanaging partner, to discuss challenges and corporate culture inpart two of this exclusive interview series. You can still readpart one: Carving Out a Big Nice in a Down Market.

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GlobeSt.com: What were some key hurdles you have had toovercome during the last 10 years to get to where you arenow?

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Wright: We're in the business of people. Coordinatingpeople is very difficult, so it's been hard. We've had personalchallenges, going through that great recession—something thatimpacted Florida and the real estate industry very deeply.

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It brought a whole host of challenges, from financial pressuresto a lot of talent leaving the business to longtime clients goingout of business. Having to constantly reinvent yourself and adaptto that new environment was one of the biggest challenges that wedealt with.

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You also experience new challenges as you grow. Managing acompany culture is different when you're 25 people than when you'remore than 250 people.

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The messaging and coordination has been a challenge. When you'regrowing, you're always doing something that's never been done inyour company's history. It's hard to remain innovative while alsobalancing your company values and caring about people.

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What I've learned in 10 years is that business is aboutovercoming challenges and solving problems. Your ability to raiseyour game to meet each challenge, each time, is something that wehave done well, and hopefully will continue to do movingforward.

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GlobeSt.com: How important is company culture in thecommercial real estate industry?

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Wright: Company culture is important to all people. Lifeis about more than earning a paycheck and all people realizethat.

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The grass isn't always greener on the other side. People leave acompany because they hate where they work, but then realize thatwhile the issues may change, they have problems at their new job aswell. That situation will always be exacerbated by how people feelabout their coworkers, their supervisors, their opportunities andthe leaders of the organization.

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Aside from how they feel about their surroundings, people wantto feel they are a part of something important. At the end of theday, that's what it's all about, for myself included. It's abouthaving all your work matter.

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It's not just about doing a job and collecting a pay check. Inthe end, you'll look back on your life and ask, “Where did I make adifference? What did I contribute?” I think that's true foreverybody, everywhere, not just at Franklin Street and not just inthe real estate industry.

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Andrew Wright, CEO and managing partner of Franklin Street

|

ATLANTA—After 10 years in the industry, Franklin Streethas learned plenty—and overcome its fair share of challenges.GlobeSt.com caught up with Andrew Wright, the firm's CEO andmanaging partner, to discuss challenges and corporate culture inpart two of this exclusive interview series. You can still readpart one: Carving Out a Big Nice in a Down Market.

|

GlobeSt.com: What were some key hurdles you have had toovercome during the last 10 years to get to where you arenow?

|

Wright: We're in the business of people. Coordinatingpeople is very difficult, so it's been hard. We've had personalchallenges, going through that great recession—something thatimpacted Florida and the real estate industry very deeply.

|

It brought a whole host of challenges, from financial pressuresto a lot of talent leaving the business to longtime clients goingout of business. Having to constantly reinvent yourself and adaptto that new environment was one of the biggest challenges that wedealt with.

|

You also experience new challenges as you grow. Managing acompany culture is different when you're 25 people than when you'remore than 250 people.

|

The messaging and coordination has been a challenge. When you'regrowing, you're always doing something that's never been done inyour company's history. It's hard to remain innovative while alsobalancing your company values and caring about people.

|

What I've learned in 10 years is that business is aboutovercoming challenges and solving problems. Your ability to raiseyour game to meet each challenge, each time, is something that wehave done well, and hopefully will continue to do movingforward.

|

GlobeSt.com: How important is company culture in thecommercial real estate industry?

|

Wright: Company culture is important to all people. Lifeis about more than earning a paycheck and all people realizethat.

|

The grass isn't always greener on the other side. People leave acompany because they hate where they work, but then realize thatwhile the issues may change, they have problems at their new job aswell. That situation will always be exacerbated by how people feelabout their coworkers, their supervisors, their opportunities andthe leaders of the organization.

|

Aside from how they feel about their surroundings, people wantto feel they are a part of something important. At the end of theday, that's what it's all about, for myself included. It's abouthaving all your work matter.

|

It's not just about doing a job and collecting a pay check. Inthe end, you'll look back on your life and ask, “Where did I make adifference? What did I contribute?” I think that's true foreverybody, everywhere, not just at Franklin Street and not just inthe real estate industry.

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