A survey from a tenant experienceprovider says employees are productive while working at home amidthe coronavirus pandemic, but they do struggle with the absence ofcoworker interaction and "sub-optimal workenvironments."

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The survey is from the companyEquiem, which collected more than 4,500 poll and survey responses,according to a company report. The survey was conducted duringApril and May and the company surveyed occupiers tied to companiesin Australia, Ireland, the US and the UnitedKingdom. 

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The coronavirus pandemic, whichspurred stay-at-home orders for wide swathes of the USearlier this year, put a focus on work-from-home operations in aneffort to limit close in-person contacts that spread thecoronavirus. 

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A wide majority of employees, 82percent, said they were as or more productive at their home,according to the report. But 56 percent wanted better work setupsand 45 percent missed having conversations with colleagues, thedocument said. The report says a quarter wanted "better access tohome health and wellness options."

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The company found thatimpairments to productivity included technical and Internet issues,along with distractions and requests from family members and noexplicit start or end to the day.

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Meanwhile, the report says 60percent of employees will not be coming back to the office until"it feels safe" and communication and information are importantfactors for their return.

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"Upon returning, over 80% ofemployees expect up-to-date information on active in-buildingCOVID-19 cases, new safety procedures (including use offacilities), and cleaning procedures from their landlords orcompany. Over 60% also expect current office density information tobe available," according to the report.

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Employees in Australia generallysaid they are more productive compared to prior to the coronaviruslockdowns, according to the report. That stood in contrast toemployees in the United Kingdom and in the US, a good portion ofwhich said they were about the same when it came to productivity,according to the report.

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"The COVID-19 pandemic andsubsequent lockdown period has accelerated the evolution of theoffice," according to the report. "More occupiers will work fromhome after lockdown ends, therefore owners need to be even moreproactive in understanding their needs and delivering solutions toaddress them. They will need to rebuild trust with occupiers,reposition the office as a safe and productive environment, whilebeing able to communicate with tenants who are in the office and athome."

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Ryan Tarinelli

Ryan Tarinelli is a reporter at the New York Law Journal. He is based at the New York State Capitol in Albany, New York. He can be reached through email at [email protected]. Follow him on Twitter: @ryantarinelli.